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Julie Lythcott-Haims speaks about mental health

New York Times bestselling author Julie Lythcott-Haims addressed the Upper School at a special assembly on April 27. Ms. Lythcott-Haims’ books include How to Raise an Adult and, more recently, Your Turn: How to Be an Adult. Thanks to Olivia Eads ’23 and Annabel Cronic ’23 for introducing our guest speaker.

Her message to students could be encapsulated in three points: 

  • It isn’t enough to be good at something; if you also love it, pursue it.
  • When you love yourself, you belong to yourself.
  • It’s both scary and amazing to be in charge of yourself.

Ms. Lythcott-Haims also spoke to parents from Potomac and the wider community, at an evening event co-sponsored by The Potomac School and the Safe Community Coalition. In that presentation, she emphasized...

  • Don't add pressure and stress to your children's lives by over-parenting.
  • Allow your children to take the driver's seat for their own lives.
  • Love and support your children unconditionally.

Check out Julie Lythcott-Haims' TED Talk, "How to raise successful kids – without overparenting," which has had more than 2.6 million views!

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Julie Lythcott-Haims speaks to students at upper school assembly

New York Times bestselling author Julie Lythcott-Haims addressed the Upper School at a special assembly on April 27. Ms. Lythcott-Haims’ books include How to Raise an Adult and, more recently, Your Turn: How to Be an Adult. Thanks to Olivia Eads ’23 and Annabel Cronic ’23 for introducing our guest speaker.

Throughout August, students in grades 11 and 12 were invited to participate in a leadership seminar facilitated by US Director of Student Life Jake Westermann. The group took part in two virtual sessions, where they sought to understand their own leadership strengths and areas for growth, discuss the characteristics that define effective leaders, and analyze the successes and failures of corporate executives using business school case studies. For the third and final session, students came to campus and used Stanford Design School’s model for problem solving (“Design Thinking”) to tackle a list of challenges they wanted to address and potentially implement at Potomac. This group will have an opportunity during the school year to present their ideas to members of the Upper School leadership team.

As I was beginning my Potomac journey, I first heard about “generosity of spirit”.  When I asked “what does generosity of spirit look like at Potomac”, I was told a story about our robotics program and two of our teams that were competing in the national finals of the US Open Robotics championship.

Both teams were well-prepared, skilled and highly competitive eager, to win the championship.  In that final match, one team- perhaps the stronger team had a malfunction- their robot needed to be repaired and could not continue without a timeout. The team used a 30 second time out, but unfortunately, they did not have enough time to make all the necessary repairs. 

Just think about the situation. Your team, can win the championship because your opponent cannot get their robot repaired in time to finish. Most of us would allow the team to default and declare victory.

Ben Choi Regeneron Finalist

Potomac senior Ben Choi has been named a Top 40 Scholar in the Regeneron Science Talent Search 2022, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science and mathematics competition for high school seniors. Chosen from a pool of more than 1,800 highly qualified entrants from across the nation, Choi will participate in the final weeklong competition in Washington, DC, this March.